The Systematicity Arguments

This book addresses a part of a problem. The problem is to determine the architecture of cognition, that is, the basic structures and mechanisms underlying cognitive processing. This is a multidimensional problem insofar as there appear to be many distinct types of mechanisms that interact in divers...

Full description

Main Author: Aizawa, Kenneth L.
Corporate Author: SpringerLink (Online service)
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: New York, NY Springer US 2003, 2003
Edition:1st ed. 2003
Series:Studies in Brain and Mind
Subjects:
Online Access:
Collection: Springer Book Archives -2004 - Collection details see MPG.ReNa
LEADER 03598nmm a2200361 u 4500
001 EB000623548
003 EBX01000000000000000476630
005 00000000000000.0
007 cr|||||||||||||||||||||
008 140122 ||| eng
020 |a 9781461502753 
100 1 |a Aizawa, Kenneth L. 
245 0 0 |a The Systematicity Arguments  |h Elektronische Ressource  |c by Kenneth L. Aizawa 
250 |a 1st ed. 2003 
260 |a New York, NY  |b Springer US  |c 2003, 2003 
300 |a XV, 255 p  |b online resource 
505 0 |a 1. The Structure of Cognitive Representations -- 1.1 Some Theories of Cognitive Architecture -- 1.2 An Outline for the Book -- 2. Some History and Philosophy of Science -- 2.1 Copernican and Ptolemaic Astronomy -- 2.2 Darwinian Evolution and Creationism -- 2.3 What these Arguments have in Common -- 2.4 Some Broader Implications of our Explanatory Standards -- 2.5 Taking Stock -- 3. The Productivity of Thought -- 3.1 The Productivity Argument -- 4. The Systematicity of Inference -- 4.1 What is the Systematicity of Inference? -- 4.2 The Case Against the Systematicity of Inference -- 4.3 Explaining the Systematicity of Inference -- 4.4 Taking Stock -- 5. The Systematicity of Cognitive Representations -- 5.1 What is the Systematicity of Cognitive Representations? -- 5.2 Pure Atomistic Accounts of the Systematicity of Cognitive Representations -- 5.3 Classical Accounts of the Systematicity of Cognitive Representations -- 5.4 Taking Stock -- 6. The Compositionality of Representations -- 6 
653 |a Cognitive Psychology 
653 |a Philosophy of Mind 
653 |a Modern philosophy 
653 |a Artificial Intelligence 
653 |a Cognitive psychology 
653 |a Philosophy of mind 
653 |a Modern Philosophy 
653 |a Artificial intelligence 
710 2 |a SpringerLink (Online service) 
041 0 7 |a eng  |2 ISO 639-2 
989 |b SBA  |a Springer Book Archives -2004 
490 0 |a Studies in Brain and Mind 
856 |u https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4615-0275-3?nosfx=y  |x Verlag  |3 Volltext 
082 0 |a 128.2 
520 |a This book addresses a part of a problem. The problem is to determine the architecture of cognition, that is, the basic structures and mechanisms underlying cognitive processing. This is a multidimensional problem insofar as there appear to be many distinct types of mechanisms that interact in diverse ways during cognitive processing. Thus, we have memory, attention, learning, sensation, perception, and who knows what else, interacting to produce behavior. As a case in point, consider a bit of linguistic behavior. To tell a friend that I think Greg won a stunning victory, I must evidently rely on various bits of information stored in my memory, including who my friends are, who Greg is, what he won, and what natural languages I share with my friend. I must sense and perceive that my friend is within hearing distance, how loud I need to speak, how loud I am speaking, and whether my friend is paying attention. I must avail myself of what I know about the language I share with my friend, along with innumerable principles about human "folk psychology. " This book does not address the full range of contemporary theorizing about cognitive architecture, but only a part. It addresses theories of cognitive architecture that hypothesize that there exist cognitive representations, then begins to explore the possible structure of these representations. One of the leading hypotheses concerning the structure of cognitive representations is that it is akin to that found in symbolic logic