Molecular Approaches to Fundamental and Applied Entomology

Insects as a group occupy a middle ground in the biosphere between bacteria and viruses at one extreme, amphibians and mammals at the other. The size and general nature of insects present special problems to the study of entomology. For example, many commercially available instruments are geared to...

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Corporate Author: SpringerLink (Online service)
Other Authors: Oakeshott, John (Editor), Whitten, Max J. (Editor)
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: New York, NY Springer New York 1993, 1993
Edition:1st ed. 1993
Series:Springer Series in Experimental Entomology
Subjects:
Online Access:
Collection: Springer Book Archives -2004 - Collection details see MPG.ReNa
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505 0 |a New Strategies for Pest Control -- Molecular Methods for Insect Phylogenetics -- Molecular Population Genetics of Drosophila -- The Regulation of Cellular Pattern Formation in the Compound Eye of Drosophila melanogaster -- Molecular Genetics of Sex Determination in Drosophila melanogaster -- Molecular Genetics of Complex Behavior: Biological Rhythms in Drosophila -- Molecular Analysis of Insect Meiosis and Sex Ratio Distortion -- Strategies and Tools for Extending Molecular Entomology Beyond Drosophila -- Prospects and Possibilities for Gene Transfer Techniques in Insects 
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520 |a Insects as a group occupy a middle ground in the biosphere between bacteria and viruses at one extreme, amphibians and mammals at the other. The size and general nature of insects present special problems to the study of entomology. For example, many commercially available instruments are geared to measure in grams, while the forces commonly encountered in studying insects are in the milligram range. Therefore, techniques developed in the study of insects or in those fields concerned with the control of insect pests are often unique. Methods for measuring things are common to all sciences. Advances sometimes depend more on how something was done than on what was measured; indeed a given field often progresses from one technique to another as new methods are discovered, developed, and modified. Just as often, some of these techniques find their way into the classroom when the problems involved have been sufficiently ironed out to permit students to master the manipulations in a few laboratory periods. Many specialized techniques are confined to one specific research laboratory. Although methods may be considered commonplace where they are used, in another context even the simplest procedures may save considerable time. It is the purpose of this series (1) to report new developments in methodology, (2) to reveal sources of groups who have dealt with and solved particular entomological problems, and (3) to describe experiments which may be applicable for use in biology laboratory courses