APA Citation

Penn, W. (1701). A key, opening the way to every common understanding: How to discern the difference between the religion professed by the people called Quakers, and the perversions, misrepresentations and calumnies of their several adversaries, both upon their Principles and Practices. With an exhortation to all People to consider their Religion and Ways, and to turn speedily to the Lord. Published in great good Will to all; but more especially for their Sakes That are actually under Prejudice from vulgar Abuses. The eleventh impression, by W. Penn. London: printed, for Thomas Northcott, in George-Alley in Lombard-Street.

Chicago Style Citation

Penn, William. A Key, Opening the Way to Every Common Understanding: How to Discern the Difference between the Religion Professed By the People Called Quakers, and the Perversions, Misrepresentations and Calumnies of Their Several Adversaries, Both Upon Their Principles and Practices. With an Exhortation to All People to Consider Their Religion and Ways, and to Turn Speedily to the Lord. Published in Great Good Will to All; but More Especially for Their Sakes That Are Actually Under Prejudice From Vulgar Abuses. The Eleventh Impression, By W. Penn. London: printed, for Thomas Northcott, in George-Alley in Lombard-Street, 1701.

MLA Citation

Penn, William. A Key, Opening the Way to Every Common Understanding: How to Discern the Difference between the Religion Professed By the People Called Quakers, and the Perversions, Misrepresentations and Calumnies of Their Several Adversaries, Both Upon Their Principles and Practices. With an Exhortation to All People to Consider Their Religion and Ways, and to Turn Speedily to the Lord. Published in Great Good Will to All; but More Especially for Their Sakes That Are Actually Under Prejudice From Vulgar Abuses. The Eleventh Impression, By W. Penn. London: printed, for Thomas Northcott, in George-Alley in Lombard-Street, 1701.

Warning: These citations may not always be 100% accurate.