On the Formation of the Most Massive Stars in the Galaxy

The most massive stars in the galaxy - those with more than 15 to 20 solar masses - are lilkely to ionize their surroundings before they reach their final mass. How can they accrete in spite of the presence of over-pressurized gas? This thesis presents results of Submillimeter Array (SMA) and Very L...

Full description

Main Author: Galván-Madrid, Roberto J.
Corporate Author: SpringerLink (Online service)
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: New York, NY Springer New York 2012, 2012
Edition:1st ed. 2012
Series:Springer Theses, Recognizing Outstanding Ph.D. Research
Subjects:
Online Access:
Collection: Springer eBooks 2005- - Collection details see MPG.ReNa
Summary:The most massive stars in the galaxy - those with more than 15 to 20 solar masses - are lilkely to ionize their surroundings before they reach their final mass. How can they accrete in spite of the presence of over-pressurized gas? This thesis presents results of Submillimeter Array (SMA) and Very Large Array (VLA) studies of massive star formation regions in the early stages of ionization, as well as an analysis of numerical simulations of the evolution of these young HII regions. The results favor a picture in which very massive stars form in accretion flows that are partially ionized and that keep accreting material from their environment. The American Astronomical Society selected Roberto Galvan-Madrid as a prize winner for The Rodger Doxsey Travel Prize in 2010
Physical Description:XIII, 122 p. 49 illus., 23 illus. in color online resource
ISBN:9781461433088