From users to custodians : changing relations between people and the state in forest management in Tanzania

In the face of scarce public resources and burgeoning demand from the growing population for agricultural land and woodland products. Tanzania has increasingly recognized the need to bring individuals, local groups, and communities into the policy, planning, and management process if woodlands are t...

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Main Author: Wily, Liz
Corporate Author: World Bank Africa Technical Families
Other Authors: Dewees, Peter A.
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: Washington, D.C World Bank, Africa Technical Families, Environment and Social Development Unit 2001, 2001
Series:Policy research working paper
Subjects:
Online Access:
Collection: World Bank E-Library Archive - Collection details see MPG.ReNa
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520 |a In the face of scarce public resources and burgeoning demand from the growing population for agricultural land and woodland products. Tanzania has increasingly recognized the need to bring individuals, local groups, and communities into the policy, planning, and management process if woodlands are to remain productive in the coming decades