A Transitory Regime Water Supply in Conakry, Guinea

June 2000 - In several ways, the reform introduced to the water sector in Conakry, Guinea, in 1989 under a World Bank-led project was remarkable. It showed that even in a weak institutional environment, where contracts are hard to enforce and political interference is common, private sector particip...

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Main Author: Clarke, George
Other Authors: Ménard, Claude
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: Washington, D.C The World Bank 1999, 1999
Subjects:
Online Access:
Collection: World Bank E-Library Archive - Collection details see MPG.ReNa
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653 |a Banks and Banking Reform 
653 |a Cost Of Water 
653 |a Debt Markets 
653 |a Drinking Water 
653 |a Finance and Financial Sector Development 
653 |a Financial Literacy 
653 |a Households 
653 |a Industry 
653 |a Mortality Rate 
653 |a Pipeline 
653 |a Pit Latrines 
653 |a Population Growth 
653 |a Price Of Water 
653 |a Private Operator 
653 |a Private Participation 
653 |a Public Sector Corruption and Anticorruption Measures 
653 |a Raw Water 
653 |a Town Water Supply and Sanitation 
653 |a Urban Areas 
653 |a Urban Water 
653 |a Urban Water Supply and Sanitation 
653 |a Water 
653 |a Water Conservation 
653 |a Water Resources 
653 |a Water Resources 
653 |a Water Sector 
653 |a Water Supply 
653 |a Water Supply and Sanitation 
653 |a Water Supply and Sanitation Governance and Institutions 
653 |a Water System 
653 |a Water Systems 
653 |a Water Use 
653 |a Water and Industry 
653 |a Wells 
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700 1 |a Clarke, George 
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520 |a June 2000 - In several ways, the reform introduced to the water sector in Conakry, Guinea, in 1989 under a World Bank-led project was remarkable. It showed that even in a weak institutional environment, where contracts are hard to enforce and political interference is common, private sector participation can improve sector performance. Why did the sector improve as much as it did, and what has inhibited reform? Both consumers and the government benefited from reform of the water system in Conakry, Guinea, whose deterioration since independence had become critical by the mid-1980s. Less than 40 percent of Conakry's population had access to piped water - low even by regional standards - and service was intermittent, at best, for the few who had connections. The public agency in charge of the sector was inefficient, overstaffed, and virtually insolvent. In several ways, the reform introduced to the sector in 1989 under a World Bank-led project was remarkable.  
520 |a It showed that even in a weak institutional environment, where contracts are hard to enforce and political interference is common, private sector participation can improve sector performance. Ménard and Clarke discuss the mechanisms that made progress possible and identify factors that inhibit the positive effects of reform. Water has become very expensive, the number of connections has increased very slowly, and conflicts have developed between SEEG (the private operator) and SONEG (the state agency). Among the underlying problems: · The lack of strong, stable institutions. · The lack of an independent agency capable of restraining arbitrary government action, regulating the private operator, and enforcing contractual arrangements. · The lack of adequate conflict resolution mechanisms for contract disputes. · Weak administrative capacity.  
520 |a This paper - a joint product of Public Economics and Regulation and Competition Policy, Development Research Group - is part of a larger effort in the group to promote competition and private sector development. The study was funded by the Bank's Research Support Budget under the research project Institutions, Politics, and Contracts: Private Sector Participation in Urban Water Supply (RPO 681-87). The authors may be contacted at menard@univ-paris1.fr or gclarke@worldbank.org