Taxing Issues with Privatization : A Checklist

May 2000 - The literature on privatization has overlooked how the tax status of the company to be privatized will affect the firm's, and the country's, financial transition. Privatization has been a popular strategy for improving efficiency in both market and transition economies. The lite...

Full description

Main Author: Mintz, M. Jack
Other Authors: Chen, Duanjie, Zorotheos, Evangelia
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: Washington, D.C The World Bank 1999, 1999
Subjects:
Tax
Online Access:
Collection: World Bank E-Library Archive - Collection details see MPG.ReNa
Summary:May 2000 - The literature on privatization has overlooked how the tax status of the company to be privatized will affect the firm's, and the country's, financial transition. Privatization has been a popular strategy for improving efficiency in both market and transition economies. The literature on privatization includes broad discussions of pricing techniques but overlooks tax issues. In reality, a state-owned company loses its privilege of paying no taxes once it is privatized. This change in tax status would certainly complicate the financial transition of a newly privatized company, affect industrywide economic efficiency, and change the revenue pattern of governments. Using Ontario Hydro and the Canadian tax regime as examples, Mintz, Chen, and Zorotheos provide policymakers with a checklist on tax issues under privatization. Their main observations: · The tax status of the company to be privatized must be considered in analyzing the firm's financial transition.
· The economic efficiency targeted by privatization may depend partly on the tax regime for a particular industry. · Privatization affects government revenue through the revenue-sharing structure determined by intergovernmental fiscal relationships and cross-border tax arrangements. Time is a factor in tax and transition issues. At the time of privatization, for example, how are assets to be valued for calculating capital gains and cost deductions, for tax purposes? Are the assets transferred to the new owners at fair market value, book value, or at cost, for tax purposes? How should heavy debt loads be treated? Ontario Hydro will not be privatized but it will become taxable. How the taxes will be paid will depend on how the transition is treated. Tax policy will be a key determinant of the industry's future development.
This paper - a product of the Governance, Regulation, and Finance Division, World Bank Institute - is part of a larger effort in the institute to increase understanding of infrastructure regulation
Physical Description:Online-Ressource (1 online resource (44 p.))