Trade and Regulatory Reform : Insights from Country Experience

As trade barriers at the border have fallen through successive trade negotiations, domestic regulation has emerged as a source of residual but potentially significant trade barriers. Recognising the importance of participating in intensified global competition, countries increasingly see regulatory...

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Corporate Author: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: Paris OECD Publishing 2001, 2001
Subjects:
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Collection: OECD Books and Papers - Collection details see MPG.ReNa
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505 0 |a Chapter 1. Trade and Regulatory Reform: Insights from the OECD Country Reviews and Other Analyses by Keiya Iida -- Part I. Experience and Best Practices with the Transparency Principle -- Chapter 2. Transparency Issues and the WTO Working Party on Domestic Regulation by Dale B. Honeck -- Chapter 3. The Experiences of the IMF and Its Membership with Transparency and Related International Financial Reforms by Anne McGuirk -- Chapter 4. Transparency: A Business Perspective by John Serocold -- Chapter 5. Consumer Interests in Regulatory and Trade Policies by Jill Johnstone, Naja Felter and Marcus Lenzen -- Part II. Experience and Best Practices in Applying the Principles of Non-Discrimination, Avoiding Unnecessary Trade Restrictiveness and Competition -- Chapter 6. International Trade as a Vector in Domestic Regulatory Reform: Discrimination, Cost-Benefit Analysis and Negotiations by Joel P. Tractman -- Chapter 7. Regulatory Reform in Infrastructure: The Indian Experience by S. Sundar -- Part III. Experience and Best Practices in Internationally Harmonised Measures and Recognition of Foreign Equivalent Measures -- Chapter 8. "Deeper" Integration in Services Trade in the Western Hemisphere: Domestic Regulation and Mutual Recognition by Sherry M. Stephenson -- Chapter 9. Harmonisation and Recognition: What Have We Learned? Some Precautionary Reflections by Kalypso Nicolaidis -- Chapter 10. Internationally Harmonised Measures and Recognition of Foreign Equivalent Measures by Julian Arkell -- Part IV. Future Perspectives -- Chapter 11. Keynote Speech: Trade, Regulation, and Governance by Jonathan T. Fried -- Chapter 12. Regulatory Diversity and Trade and Investment Liberalisation by Michael Trebilcock -- Chapter 13. The Approach to Economic Reform in China: An Outline by Larry Lee -- Chapter 14. A Personal View of the Issues of Julian Arkell -- Annex: List of Speakers and Discussants 
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520 |a As trade barriers at the border have fallen through successive trade negotiations, domestic regulation has emerged as a source of residual but potentially significant trade barriers. Recognising the importance of participating in intensified global competition, countries increasingly see regulatory reform as an inescapable policy to ensure that the expected benefits of globalisation are realised and that differences in national regulatory systems do not become barriers to international trade and investment. In this light, OECD has undertaken a broad-ranging project on regulatory reform, for which market openness is seen as a key objective. The papers collected in this volume were presented at a workshop at OECD that aimed to share national experiences of regulatory reform and trade and to foster consensus-building on best practices. Such practices include enhanced transparency, non-discriminatory due process, independence of regulators and active implementation of competition policy. Other issues raised at the workshop included the challenges for developing countries in pursuing regulatory reform and enhancing market openness,  and insights for multilateral trading rule-making emerging from country experiences. The discussions reveal the pervasiveness of the issues raised at the workshop. In examining the recent development of regulatory issues in trade policy making, this volume brings new light to experiences in some parts of Asia and the Western hemisphere as well as to the growing links among trade, regulation and governance