John Somers, 1st Baron Somers

John Somers, 1st Baron Somers, (4 March 1651 – 26 April 1716) was an English Whig jurist and statesman. Somers first came to national attention in the trial of the Seven Bishops where he was on their defence counsel. He published tracts on political topics such as the succession to the crown, where he elaborated his Whig principles in support of the Exclusionists. He played a leading part in shaping the Revolution settlement. He was Lord High Chancellor of England under King William III and was a chief architect of the union between England and Scotland achieved in 1707 and the Protestant succession achieved in 1714. He was a leading Whig during the twenty-five years after 1688; with four colleagues he formed the Whig Junto. Provided by Wikipedia

1
by Somers, John Somers Cocks
Published 1813
Printed for J. Ridgway

2
by Somers, John Somers Cocks
Published 1833
Hatchard

3
by Somers, John Somers
Published 1733
Printed by E. and R. Nutt, and R. Gosling (assigns of E. Sayer) for S. Billingsly

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by Somers, John Somers
Published 1727
Printed by A. Rhames, for J. Hyde, R. Gunne, R. Owen, and E. Dobson

12
by Somers, John Somers
Published 1773
London, printed: New-York: re-printed by Hodge and Shober, for Noel and Hazard

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by Somers, John Somers
Published 1714
printed and sold by Ferd. Burleigh, in Amen-Corner

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by Somers, John Somers Cocks
Published 1791
printed for R. Faulder, New Bond Street

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by Somers, John Somers
Published 1701
s.n

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by Somers, John Somers
Published 1733
In the Savoy: printed by E. and R. Nutt, and R. Gosling, (assigns of Edward Sayer, Esq;) for S. Billingsley

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by Somers, John Somers
Published 1718
printed for J. Smith in the year 1716, and reprinted in the year

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by Somers, John Somers
Published 1730
printed for D. Browne, at the Black-Swan without Temple-Bar