Richard Oastler

Richard Oastler (20 December 1789 – 22 August 1861) "the Factory King" was a "Tory radical", an active opponent of Catholic Emancipation and Parliamentary Reform and a lifelong admirer of the Duke of Wellington; but also an abolitionist and prominent in the "anti-Poor Law" resistance to the implementation of the "New Poor Law" of 1834. Most notably, as his sobriquet indicates, he was at the heart of the campaign for a ten-hour working day in its early years: although less so by the time of its successful culmination in the Factories Act 1847, he retained the sobriquet.

"Moved by pity and indignation at the long hours worked by young children in factories, he devoted his life to their emancipation, and was a tireless champion of the Ten Hours Factory Bill" noted a commemorative plaque erected in Leeds parish church in 1925. "He cannot altogether claim prominence as a political thinker...but history acclaims him not as a politician, but as an agitator" commented the ''Yorkshire Post'' on that occasion. Provided by Wikipedia

3
by Oastler, Richard
Published 1835
Printed and published by J. Hobson

5
by Oastler, Richard
Published 1835
s.n

6
by Oastler, Richard
Published 1835
s.n

7
by Oastler, Richard
Published 1835
Printed and published by J. Hobson

9
by Oastler, Richard
Published 1836
s.n

10
by Oastler, Richard
Published 1838
[s.n.]

11
by Oastler, Richard
Published 1833
s.n

13
by Oastler, Richard
Published 1833
s.n
Subjects: '; ...Oastler, Richard / 1789-1861...

14
by Oastler, Richard
Published 1833
s.n

15
by Oastler, Richard
Published 1833
s.n

16
by Oastler, Richard
Published 1838
Roake and Varty

17
by Oastler, Richard
Published 1827
[s.n.]

19
by Oastler, Richard
Published 1833
s.n