Rhoda Erdmann

Erdmann (left) in her Berlin laboratory, 1929 Rhoda Erdmann (5 December 1870 – 23 August 1935) was a German cell biologist. Working in the early 1900's, Erdmann was a pioneer of cellular biology and one of few women in her field. Erdmann's work centered around the reproduction of protozoa, with a particular interest in tissue culture and ''in vitro'' cellular reproduction. Her work as a protozoologist earned her a position at Yale University as a lecturer at the graduate school, though her time in America was cut short by anti-German sentiment surrounding World War I. After a forcible incarceration and then deportation in 1919, Erdmann took a research position at the Institute for Cancer Research at the Charité Hospital of the Friedrich‐Wilhelms University of Berlin. There she instituted the first department for experimental cytology in Germany. She worked at the University for almost 10 years before receiving an official professorship in 1929. Her work was interrupted yet again with the rise of Hitlerism in 1933, when she was stripped of her professorship. She died in Berlin in 1935. Provided by Wikipedia

1
by Erdmann, Rhoda
Published 1930
Springer Berlin Heidelberg

2
by Erdmann, Rhoda
Published 1922
Springer Berlin Heidelberg